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Honoring Black History Month by Spotlighting Black Creators and Culture

February 1, 2021

From celebrating Black Music Month in June to a Burna Boy takeover for Nigerian Independence Day last fall, Spotify is committed to celebrating and amplifying Black voices year-round. 

This February, in honor of Black History Month, we’re continuing to recognize and uplift the rich history and voices of the Black community through guest-curated playlist takeovers, brand-new podcasts, and more on our Black History Is Now hub. Read on to learn more.

Spotlight on Black photographers

In an effort to showcase a wide spectrum of Black talent, Spotify is licensing the work of seven Black photographers to curate specialty cover art for our eight key Black playlists. For example, the Black History Salute playlist, which shares work from poets, features photography from Shawn Theodore. Sound Stories: Black Music, a podcast playlist that contains a collection of stories that go behind the scenes of iconic artists and songs, presents the work of photographer Adreinne Waheed

New playlist takeovers and content

Get a taste of what influential Black curators, celebrities, and creatives are listening to through new exclusive playlist takeovers. American jazz artist Keyon Harrold Sr. and his son Keyon Harrold Jr. are no strangers to speaking out against injustice. The two use the power of music to further conversation and will continue to do so with their Black Lives Matter playlist takeover in partnership with the organization Color of Change. American rapper 2 Chainz will guest curate I Love My HBCU, a playlist that features homecoming anthems from historically black colleges and universities. 

In addition to the takeovers, Spotify is debuting new and refreshed playlist content. This month will see the launch of four new hip-hop playlists: New Joints, Door Knockers, Trophy Room, and City to City. Three existing playlists, Westside Story (formerly “Cali Fire”), No Cap (formerly “The Realest Down South”), and Out The Mud (formerly “Off The Strength”), will unveil both refreshed looks and new sounds.

Special guest podcast episodes

This Black History Month, we’ll also be releasing new podcasts, as well as hosting special guest episodes with key Black creators whose voices can help guide important conversations. 

On the podcast Higher Learning with Van Lathan and Rachel Lindsay, the cohosts dissect the biggest topics in Black culture, politics, and sports. This month there will be four special Wednesday episodes that feature a variety of guests.

In The Bakari Sellers Podcast, the American attorney, political commentator, and politician tackles pressing current events from the world of politics. The show also covers key moments in Black History through conversations and interviews with Charles Blow, Yahya Abdul-Mateen II, and Nnamdi Asomugha.

On February 4, Black Girl Songbook, a new show that follows a music-and-talk format, debuts. Hosted by magazine editor and journalist Danyel Smith, this show celebrates and uplifts the talents of Black women in the music industry. From songwriters to producers, listeners will follow along as Smith explores the creative minds of these successful women.

The Get Up, a morning show that brings you all the latest news, music, and entertainment, will be spotlighting the special individuals who are making Black history now—from Eugene Goodman and Letitia James to Ryan Coogler and Joy Reid.

Whether you’re looking to enjoy boundary-breaking music or kick back with an insightful and educational podcast, Black History Is Now has the content you need to celebrate and enjoy the voices of the Black community. But that’s not all you can find on the platform. Spotify takes its responsibility of amplifying Black voices seriously, and year-round you can find exclusive content such as the RapCaviar and Feelin’ Myself playlists, as well as podcasts like Jemele Hill’s Unbothered and Resistance, which highlight Black culture and creators. Visit the hub to explore more.